Stories In Stitches 3: World War I & 2 Knitting

 

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What you’re looking at on your screen is not a normal knitting pattern book. Inside these pages you will find knitting patterns, charts, and tutorials. But you’ll also find the stories that go with each project. There are stories from yesterday and today, as well as stories from near and far away. These stories will bring a richness of connection and a sense of community to your knitting.

Authors: Donna Druchunas & Ava Coleman


Go Inside Stories In Stitches 3: World Wars 1 & 2

ContentsLook InsideProject PhotosEditor's Letter
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WHAT’S INSIDE?
Editor’s Letter
Our Creative Team
Abbreviations
Bibliography and Credits

ARTICLES
« DESTINATION: WORLD WAR I »
Pa’s Story |
Travel with Colette
Helmet Liners | Ava Coleman
Dancing Stitches and Flying Fish | Donna Druchunas

« DESTINATION: WORLD WAR II »
Synthetic and Acrylic Yarn Musings | Ava Coleman
Stitches with Purpose | Rachel Russ
The Coat | Rohn Strong
A Knitted Peace | Donna Druchunas
The Doll: A Short Story | Rohn Strong
Sophia Chart Challenge | JC Briar

WHAT’S NEXT
Sacred Stitches

PATTERNS
Colette’s Traveling Hood
Knitted Helmet
Hidden Hood
Dancing Stitches Socks
Flying Fish Knee High Socks
Hiroshima Peace Socks
The Airman Doll
W.A.A.F. Doll

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Ava Coleman

Recently Denver’s local FOX television station aired a special on seven of the remaining nine, military veterans who were stationed at Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. These gentleman returned, probably for the last time, to Hawaii to participate in a special memorial ceremony. Far more important than spending the hour at the ceremony, they spent the weekend telling their stories to school children, visitors at the memorial and the many active duty military members stationed there. The phrase “Lest we forget” certainly was forged for times like this.

On this anniversary every year I recall what my Grandma Leona shared with me about when her three boys enlisted in WWII. She never really talked about the War. She talked around it. What she shared was more personal. It was about pride and patriotism, sacrifice and family expectations. Since she was probably one of the bravest women I’ve ever known,

640xsis3-pas-storyI had to read between the lines to understand how the fear of them being wounded or killed must have been constantly heavy on her heart. Although it was not to be, her goal was that her boys would be our last family generation to have to experience the horrors of combat.

We tell our stories so future generations remember. Sometimes that is so we don’t repeat the mistakes of past generations. Other times it is to share skills and ideas with our future generations. This issue shares a bit of both.

We’ll explore WWI Belgium with my grandfather to learn how appreciated and critical knits from home were to soldiers in the trenches. Then I will share how these same basic patterns can be adapted for today’s winter activities.

Donna discusses WWII knitting, her family history, and the deep meaning that can be found in simple everyday objects with a study of socks made by Jewish knitters in the Russian Pale of Settlement before the war and socks worn by the Japanese victims of the nuclear bombing of Hiroshima at the end of the war.

As a special feature we would like to introduce you to our friend, Rohn Strong, a young designer with an interest in knitting history. Join him asww2-photo he shares a few wonderful WWII vintage dolls clothed in UK Military Uniforms. Then, read an original short story of a young boy, whose grief is alleviated by the comfort of a doll. We are most fortunate to have him share these wonderful patterns and story with us.

Yours in words and stitches,
Ava Coleman

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